Ken Shirriff goes hands-on with the PocketBeagle

Ken Shirriff has written an excellent in-depth look at the PocketBeagle:
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Hands-on with the PocketBeagle: A $25 Linux Computer

The PocketBeagle is a tiny but powerful inexpensive key-fob-sized open source Linux computer. It has 44 digital I/O pins, 8 analog inputs, and supports multiple serial I/O protocols, making it very useful as a controller. In addition, its processor includes two 200-MHz microcontrollers that allow you to implement low-latency, real-time functions while still having the capabilities of a Linux system This article discusses my experience trying out different features of the PocketBeagle, along with some technical details.

One of the most interesting features of the PocketBeagle is its PRUs, two 32-bit RISC microcontrollers that are built into the Sitara processor chip. These microcontrollers let you perform time-critical operations (such as “bit-banging” a protocol), without worrying about context switches, interrupts, or anything else interfering with your code. At the same time, the ARM processor gives high performance and a complete Linux environment. (I’ve made use of the BeagleBone’s PRU to interface to a vintage Xerox Alto’s 3 Mb/s Ethernet.)

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